Ask An Expert – What Happens if you Never Brush Your Teeth?

Ask An Expert – What Happens if you Never Brush Your Teeth?

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This week on Ask an Expert – Dental care! Welcome to Ask an Expert – the show where you submit questions to be answered by people around the school!
I’m your host Kieran Lanoie. This week on Ask an Expert, your question is, “What
happens if you never brush your teeth?” Here to answer our question is Ms Peet,
one of our Biology teachers. Welcome Ms Peet! Can you help us answer this question? I’ll do my best! To begin with, if you don’t brush your teeth even
for a week, it can start causing problems like
inflammation, gingivitis and even the start of gum disease. So that’s after
only a week. If you stretch it out to even a year, then you’re looking at
problems like periodontal disease where your teeth could actually start falling
out. So our mouths are big, dark, moist warm breeding grounds for bacteria, which is rather disgusting and it can cause a lot of problems, so what happens is the
bacteria starts to build up in your mouth, and it feeds on the sugars that
are left in your teeth from the food that we eat, and it starts to eat at that.
And then it will start to eat at the enamel and in the gums and then if you
don’t brush your teeth and take care of that, bacteria, the bacteria can continue
to eat at the enamel causing holes in the teeth, which we call cavities – right!
And those can cause their own problems because those can lead to issues like
needing a root canal, and again if it gets into the roots or gets into the
gums it can cause your teeth to fall out. Now if it gets into your bloodstream,
there’s bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus or M-R-S-A or MRSA which is a
bacteria – is a antibiotic resistant bacteria – that lives naturally in our
surroundings and our bodies can usually fight it off, but when it gets into our
gums it can go into our blood streams so if you aren’t brushing your teeth for a
year or more, that can get into your bloodstream, and it can cause everything
from heart disease and stroke, because it causes a plaque buildup in the arteries,
which can cause lots of heart problems and stroke. It can also cause problems
during pregnancy – so pregnancy you’ll see premature births, low birth weights…
things like that. The bacteria being in the system can cause immune system
issues as well, and for men it can cause them to become infertile, which is quite
interesting. So there are – like gum disease has been related to diabetes as
well. People with diabetes tend to have more incidences of gingivitis and
swollen gums. There’s other issues with, well basically just bad breath, staining
of your teeth. There’s also something – I don’t know if you’ve ever heard of
tonsil stones? Oh, yes. So tonsil stones – there’s little pockets in the back of
our throat around the tonsils, and the bacteria and particles can build up back
there and create small, sometimes soft sometimes hard stones in the back of our
throat and it makes it feel itchy and they can like cough out, but they’re just
pockets full of bacteria and particles… So wonderful! So we talked about not
brushing your teeth but is there ways to, let’s say speed up that process? Speed up
the process? Like teeth falling out and all. So if you are eating high sugar foods
if you’re drinking high sugar drinks, if you smoke – smoking will help will increase
the decay of the teeth. It’ll also break down some of your
immune system functions and like I mentioned before, diabetes. So people who
already have diabetes are at a little bit higher of a –
so they do have to take care of their teeth a bit more because of their sugar
balances in their blood. Those are I think the main ways. Yeah! Well, do you
have any tips on how to maintain your teeth? So it’s recommended that you brush
your teeth regularly morning and night and use dental floss.
Some people even suggest using a type of mouthwash after you’ve eaten just or
like rinsing your mouth with water just to get any of the extra particles out.
But maintaining your teeth and your healthcare is very important for your
overall health. Well, I think that answers our question. Thank-you so much Ms. Peet. You’re very welcome! That’s it for this week’s Ask an Expert, but we’re always looking for new questions. Tweet them at @PACarlton with the
hashtag #AskanExpert and we’ll find someone who can answer them for you. See you next week!

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