Breath of the Wild SEQUEL Trailer 1 Theories & Speculation

Breath of the Wild SEQUEL Trailer 1 Theories & Speculation

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In the last video, we broke down what we see
on screen during the trailer. Now let’s get into analyzing what’s going on behind the scenes. Starting with what Link and Zelda are doing underground in the first place. Both the True Ending of Breath of the Wild
and the art book Creating a Champion suggest that Link and Zelda travel Hyrule together
after defeating Calamity Ganon. The first question we need to ask is how Link
and Zelda entered this underground area. Zelda’s research notes state that before
the Calamity she thoroughly explored Hyrule Castle, searching for where the Guardians were stored, with little success. It would make sense if she wanted to go back to search for any other Sheikah technology yet to be uncovered. It might prove beneficial to write
a better record of where the technology is kept, or even try to improve upon it to prevent
the Calamity from taking over the Guardians and the Divine Beasts again. Or, maybe something else prompted Link and Zelda to go exploring. While Breath of the Wild focused on ancient Sheikah tech, the E3 trailer suggests we may be learning about the ancient Zonai civilization. We already know Zelda has prophetic abilities based on her diary, so perhaps something tipped her off that things were not quite right. There are several changes to their gear and appearance from the True Ending when they began their journey together. Zelda’s hair is shorter, and she dons a hood similar to Link’s Hylian hood. Link’s armor has changed as well. We see him sporting a turtleneck and a chainmail shirt under his Champion’s tunic. Over this, Link wears a chest guard. These alterations suggest they expect trials ahead, with the chainmail and chest guard
acting as extra defensive gear, and the turtleneck possibly indicating an anticipated change in climate. They are even joined by an animal who helps them carry numerous packs, presumably full of supplies. They are packed for a long journey so they must have some idea of how long a trip this is going to be. The pair cross a bridge and take a break to get water, implying that they’ve already traveled a great distance. It’s easy to assume they are underneath
the castle, though we can’t actually say for sure. Though the ground below them shakes
and collapses as the castle rises, it is possible that the shaking is simply so powerful it can be felt even far away. In the past we’ve seen the tremors of the Calamity rising from the castle being felt at the East Gate of Lanayru Road in the memory “Return of Calamity
Ganon” It’s also worth mentioning that the earth around the corpse already looks
damaged, so the castle shaking—even from a distance—might disturb the sensitive ground enough to collapse it altogether. As they enter this underground space, the
architecture resembles the Zonai ruins found throughout Hyrule. Not much is known about
the Zonai besides a few lines found in-game and what is described in the Creating a Champion
art book. As a lot of theories we discuss today will reference them, let’s go over what we know so far about this ancient civilization and their mysterious disappearance. Creating a Champion tells us that the Zonai’s The book also gives us a hint of Zonai culture, specifically how it incorporates the triforce. The art book states that they associate the following animals with the pieces of the triforce: Boar — Power Owl — Wisdom Dragon — Courage Associating the boar with power makes sense
given how Ganon will appear boar-like in many incarnations. Connecting wisdom with an owl
may be a reference to past Zelda titles, as we often see owls in games such as Ocarina
of Time or Link’s Awakening providing support and advice.
As for the triforce of courage, Creating a Champion states that the Zonai Ruins are “the
home of the Zonai. They are thought to have worshipped a water dragon, since the area
has many rock carvings dedicated to such a being. The stone structure surrounding the
Spring of Courage bears the face of a large dragon, and this place must have been a sanctuary
for the Zonai as well” (413). Given the location, the water dragon in question
is probably Farosh, seeing as it emerges from the waters of Riola Spring near the Zonai
Ruins. Other Zonai ruins include the Thundra Plateau,
connecting them to electricity, and providing another link to the tribe’s worship of Farosh.
Another association seems to be darkness. The Thyphlo Ruins house the Ketoh Wawai’s
Blessing shrine, where Link must navigate Zonai ruins shrouded in darkness. You can
use a mod by Skoolzout1 to see the ruins, where the architecture becomes much easier
to make out. Otherwise, it’s always going to be pitch black, even after completing the
shrine. Then there is imagery potentially relating
the Zonai to Ganondorf. The Barbarian armor references a war-like tribe in the Faron region,
where most of the Zonai ruins can be found. Meanwhile, the red hair and skull mask resembles
past designs of Ganondorf. Plus, this gear increases Link’s attack power, and Ganondorf
frequently wields the Triforce of Power. With that information laid out, let’s see
how it fits into the trailer. The prevalence of Zonai architecture in the
crypt draws an undeniable connection between the two. There are a couple of possibilities:
one, they built this space for Ganondorf, hoping to revive him; or two, they created
a crypt to help contain him. The outside of the crypt resembles an animal,
though it’s a bit unclear which. From what we’ve seen so far, there’s no boar, dragon,
or owl imagery to be seen underground or inside the crypt to reference the triforce. This
is odd considering how frequently these symbols show up in the Zonai architecture we come
across in our travels across Hyrule. But while we can’t draw a connection between the animal
outside the crypt and the Zonai representations for the triforce, the arm found inside does
have a similar aesthetic to a particular past Zelda title. In this trailer there is a visual reference
to Twilight Princess: the glowing arm and the swirling energy around it. They both have
a similar design to the pattern on Midna’s arms as well as to other patterns in that
game, such as those around the Twilight Portal. The Twili and the Zonai have a few notable
similarities: Both were said to have mastered the art of magic, and left the world of Hyrule
many, many years ago. Both groups also have a connection to the dark.
However, the Twili were outcast to the world of Twilight for their actions, while the Zonai
disappeared mysteriously. Their architecture and culture are different as well. The Zonai
are said to be have been fierce while the Twili were peaceful. On the other hand, their
similar history makes one wonder if there is a link between the two.
Breath of the Wild makes only one concrete reference to Twilight Princess in the memory
“Subdued Ceremony”. Given how all we know about the timeline of this game is that it
happens “far, far in the future,” the world of Twilight must have passed into myth.
Will the sequel have a more direct tie? Who knows. But it’s hard to believe this visual
similarity to the power of Twilight is just a coincidence. Now let’s move on from the visual appearance
of the arm and get into its role in Breath of the Wild 2. One way to look at it is that the arm is aiding
or powering the resurrection. The green energy being funneled down and turned into malice.
If that were the case, we may have another villain in the game besides Ganondorf.
There’s another way to look at this, however. The arm grips Ganondorf’s corpse roughly,
giving an impression that they are in conflict. In Twilight Princess, Midna, the ruler of
the realm of Twilight, aided Link and Zelda. If this arm somehow originates from that realm,
it is likely that it is on their side. In which case, it is trying to prevent Ganondorf’s
resurrection. Many people have already tried to make out a hidden message in the trailer
by reversing the audio. It sounds most like the message is saying “find my body” or
“find the body”. The chanting we hear may even be it warning them to “find the
body” before it’s too late. The most conclusive evidence yet for this
was discovered in the green magic spiraling through the air. These are not merely for
aesthetic, but actually use Gerudo script, and one can make out the words “SEAL GANON”.
This suggests the arm is part of a sealing spell. Between the Zonai’s known magical
prowess and the architecture surrounding the corpse’s location, they might be behind
this effort. Regardless, it doesn’t seem related to Zelda’s sealing magic, which
is gold in color. Then we have to wonder what the consequences
of it fusing with Link might be. The hand grabs Link’s left arm, but in the end fuses
with his right hand, his dominant hand in Breath of the Wild. There could be side-effects
that prove to be beneficial. For example, infusing Link with the ability to use magic,
like he has had in some previous games, or otherwise offer access to new abilities. After
all, he probably no longer has access to Champion’s abilities, assuming that these faded when
the Champion’s spirits passed on. Another clue may be early Breath of the Wild
concept art, shown at the Game Developers Conference. There is art of Link where his
right arm is able to transform into various tools. In another drawing, a shadowy figure
resembling Ganondorf looks down from a mound of earth floating in the air. It seems they
are bringing back some of these original ideas for the sequel. But the glowing hand isn’t as sweet as frolicking
through Hyrule Field. The trailer’s tone is ominous, and when the arm fuses with his,
Link grabs onto it and scrunches his face as if in pain. What’s going on?
Since in the trailer Link has the Master Sword, he must be quite powerful in terms of hearts
and stamina, or even at full strength. It’s unlikely we’ll be playing from the start
at this level, since the Master Sword requires at least 13 hearts to obtain in Breath of
the Wild. So, the game could simply start us off at the standard 3 hearts, with no explanation,
or the arm could offer an in-story explanation. The painful reaction could imply a loss of
strength, much like how the One-Hit Obliterator saps away Link’s hearts. It may weaken him
as a tradeoff for new abilities, or even be an outright curse that was misdirected. We
might be unable to use the Master Sword until his strength returns. This would reset Link
for a fresh start, motivating players to grow, and reclaim the Master Sword. But what about Zelda’s role in the story?
She’s no longer trapped in Hyrule Castle, but traveling alongside Link. Fans have been hoping for playable Zelda for
years. With Breath of the Wild’s more active, involved incarnation of Zelda, this desire
has flared even stronger. The trailer reveals Zelda with a short haircut
and sporting her traveler’s gear. The hair especially feels significant. In many cultures,
cutting one’s hair symbolizes a new life. It’s also more convenient if she’s traveling
and living outdoors. From a game dev standpoint, short hair is
easier to handle in motion, as longer hair tends to clip into other objects.
In the True Ending, Zelda comments that she can no longer hear the voice in the sword.
This means that she can no longer perform any magic, or that her magic is weaker. Either
way, her power as Hylia incarnate has faded, and she is no longer too overpowered for a
player character. There are a couple paths this could take:
the game alternates between the two, or you can play as both Link and Zelda in a co-op
mode. The first case, where playtime, or even the
storyline, is split between these two characters, is a more drastic change. This would play
similar to Fire Emblem Gaiden and its remake Echoes, where the player switches between
Alm’s army and Celica’s army. One potential set up is that after the ground shatters,
Link and Zelda are separated. Link is about to grab Zelda’s hand, but we don’t actually
see them connect before the arm grabs him. It’s possible that the arm pulls him up
just before Link manages to reach Zelda. Then, the two of them must search for one another
to reunite and save the day. On the other hand, they could be planning
a co-op opportunity. The Switch is a great device for co-op gameplay, after all. Aonuma
teased a Multiplayer Zelda experience way back in 2016 stating “I would like to take
what I learned from Breath of the Wild and see if we can somehow fuse those learning
points into another multiplayer Zelda” (IGN). At E3 2019, Aonuma was asked multiple times
if Zelda would be a playable character. He answered:
“It’s kind of interesting that you bring that up, because in Breath of the Wild, you see
Zelda and Link together often too, so to go straight into the thought of co-op is very
interesting to me.” When someone responded stating that people
have wanted to play as Zelda for a long time, Aonuma laughed and said “I see, but I can’t
tell you that.” There is the question of the Sheikah Slate,
which is absent from the trailer. The Sheikah Slate was integral to Link’s moveset in
Breath of the Wild. The slate belongs to the Hero–though it was Zelda’s before the
start of the game. There’s no sight of the Sheikah Slate in the trailer on either Link
or Zelda. Perhaps neither will have it. This seems unlikely, however, as the slate is versatile
with its bombs, compendium, and other runes that helped the player navigate Hyrule and
make good use of that physics engine Nintendo took 5 years to make.
Otherwise, both Link and Zelda could have their own slate, and we’ll see more runes
introduced to complement their movesets, as Purah was able to build her own Sheikah Slate
and create the age-reversing rune. But disregarding the slate, there is the question:
If Zelda were playable, even if in just a few sections of the game, what would her moveset
be? If she is a player character then she needs a way to grow in strength, equivalent
to how the Sheikah shrines trained Link. Considering the Zonai were known for their magical capabilities,
what if they had something in store for Zelda to help her hone her own magical abilities? This theory assumes that Zelda’s powers
aren’t gone forever—just that using magic for 100 years straight was taxing and she
needs to rest for a while—or that she is capable of learning other types of magic. The Zonai were said to be strong magic wielders,
perfect candidates for training Zelda. If Zelda learned more magic, it’d be a nice
way to distinguish movesets between the two in a game where Zelda is playable, with Link
being a swordsman, and Zelda being a mage. But what about about the game’s antagonist?
The corpse bears a striking resemblance to Ganondorf—Ganon’s old, Gerudo self. But
how can Ganondorf exist, even as a corpse, when in Breath of the Wild Ganon has been
sealed away? When Link and Zelda enter the crypt, they
find the corpse. Malice has taken it over. Its eyes resemble the glowing eyeballs used
by The Calamity. The substance floats through and around the body, a process reminiscent
of the cocoon found in the sanctum of Hyrule Castle. The Hyrule Compendium states that
the Calamity only began building this Scourge body composed of Malice and Sheikah Tech when
Link first awoke on The Great Plateau. But the Calamity’s plan is cut short when
Link arrives at Hyrule Castle, the body incomplete. Enraged at seeing one of its least favorite
people a.k.a the guy that’s killed it thousands of times, the Calamity breaks free and attacks.
Then, in the second phase of the battle, Zelda states that the Calamity gives up on reincarnation
to form Dark Beast Ganon in a last-ditch effort to defeat Link.
What if the Calamity felt safe doing so because it had a backup plan in the works? Rather
than wait up to 10,000 years for its next shot at destroying Hyrule, it changed tactics:
accumulate enough Malice to try and “force” a reincarnation and act out its plans with
its old Gerudo body. Given that Ganon could take control of the Guardians and Divine Beasts
using malice, and even reanimate the monsters Link slays every Blood Moon, it isn’t a
stretch to assume he could do the same with a corpse. The Calamity could be using Malice
to puppet a past Ganondorf. A humanoid form is weaker than a giant monster made of poisonous
fog. But, hey, some body is better than no body. Regardless of how Ganondorf comes back, what
will his role in the story be? Now, this is a bit of a stretch given the
information we have, but it’s something I would LOVE to see in a Zelda game: a Ganondorf
who is neutral or even good—or maybe not good, but at least on-your-side-for-now. This
works if there is a new enemy to fight. For example, if the arm, or whoever created it,
was the main antagonist of the game. That does seem unlikely, as we’ve already discussed.
But there are other options for an antagonist. Meanwhile, this has the potential to add an
interesting twist to the story. There is some evidence for this idea. If the
reversed audio is Ganondorf saying find “my” body, then it brings up the question of…
why? Why would he be urging them to find his body? It’s possible that for some reason,
Ganondorf didn’t want to be revived. In some games, we get to see a more calm,
less “literally evil incarnate” version of Ganondorf. In The Wind Waker, for example,
he remembers the hardship his homeland faced, and wishes to build a better world. He even
tells Link he doesn’t want to kill him. Ganondorf in his own way has been cursed by
Malice, reduced to a mindless force of evil. If this old version of Ganondorf is still
buried deep within Ganon, it opens up the possibility of collaboration given the right
threat. The other piece of evidence is this image
of the fight against Ganon. The hero doesn’t really look like Link. Instead of blonde hair,
he has red. His face and body seem a bit strange as well. Some people have theorized that this
is actually Ganondorf… To be honest, not so sure about this, given that Ganon and Ganondorf
are pretty much the same being, but it’s a popular theory, so I wanted to mention it.
A couple of comics by insertdisc5 really inspired this theory, links in the description. While the trailer was the only official footage
of the sequel we’ve seen as of yet, there is a lot of other material to analyze. In an interview with IGN, Aonuma stated that
while the trailer is darker in tone than Majora’s Mask, it is not related to or inspired by
that game. I feel I have to play Devil’s Advocate so I don’t get my hopes up too
high for a more grim story. In general, it’s important to be cautious with this comparison,
considering that Majora’s Mask is highly regarded but also very nostalgic for a lot
of gamers. Aonuma specifically says “What we showed you currently is a little darker”
implying that the trailer’s tone might not hold throughout the game, rather, it was done
to build intrigue (IGN). At the same time, the first trailer we saw
of Breath of the Wild did a great job at capturing the vast world of Hyrule and the fear of facing
off a Guardian. So it may be safe to assume that this trailer does the same to capture
the game’s feel. We won’t know for sure until it comes out though. With all of this in mind: just when can we
expect Breath of the Wild 2 to hit shelves? In Creating a Champion, an interview with
Eiji Aonuma reveals that they were already working on the next Zelda title. When exactly
this interview took place is unknown but the artbook was first published in Japan under
the title Master Works on December 15th, 2017. At first, people wondered whether this was
referring to the Link’s Awakening remake or to a new game entirely. However, Link’s
Awakening was made by by Grezzo, the team behind recent Zelda remakes like Ocarina of
Time 3D and Majora’s Mask 3D. This confirms that Aonuma is referring to the sequel, and
gives us a general timeline for when development began. This makes sense, given how Aonuma
has gone on record as saying they had too many DLC ideas they wanted to flesh out, that
they wanted to make a sequel. The engine of the game took 5 years to make
so minus at most a few new added features, if any, I imagine most of the work will be
going towards creating new assets. On March 28th, 2019, Monolith posted a list of job
openings for the next Zelda game. Monolith is the studio that came in to help Nintendo
work on the world players explore in Breath of the Wild.
The job listing asks for both programmers and artists, specifying that Monolith is working
on both a Zelda game, and a non-Zelda title. Since Monolith helped with building Hyrule
as we see it in Breath of the Wild, is this evidence that they once again will be creating
a new world, somewhere outside the lands of Hyrule? Further evidence of this is job listings
from Nintendo asking for landscape designers. It suggests that there are more large-scale
world development plans in the works. The castle does look like its raising, and
there are hints to suggest we’ll be delving more into what happened to the ancient Zonai
civilization. Maybe we’ll see the world they disappeared to? Finally, there is what King Zell, a leaker
notorious for his accuracy, said on January 3rd, 2019: “if you liked BOTW you will like
next year” Ok that’s it. Thanks gamers.

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