Dental Decay- Children

Dental Decay- Children

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Dental Decay Children What Causes Dental Decay There are three conditions. Bacteria, such as Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus Sobrinus and Lactobacillus. Second condition is sugars. Glucose Fructose and sucrose. The third and final condition is time In order to properly discuss dental decay We must first outline the surfaces of the teeth. The posterior teeth, such as the molars and premolars Have a mesial surface which is a surface towards the midline. A Distal surface which is a surface away from the midline. An occlusal chewing surface A buccal surface which is in contact with the cheek A lingual which is in contact with the tongue Or the palatal which is a surface that is towards the palate The anterior teeth have the same surfaces Except for some differences There is no occlusal surface on an anterior teeth There is an incisal surface which is the edged surface And a facial surface which is a surface towards the lips Let us now discuss the different layers of the teeth The enamel is the outermost part of the tooth It is the strongest part of the tooth And the first line of defense also The dentin is the second layer of the tooth and it is sandwiched between the enamel and the pulp It is softer than the enamel and is composed of dentinal tubules and fluid It is the second most sensitive part of the tooth compared to the pulp The pulp is the innermost layer of the tooth It is the most sensitive part of the tooth because it is composed of nerve tissues and blood vessels The cementum covers the roots and is for the most part unseen visually It is in contact with the periodontal ligament which attaches to the bone It is also very soft compared to the dentin Dental terms for decay Dentists use the surface that the decay has affected to chart the decay In othe words decay present on the distal which is a surface away from the midline would be called distal decay Similarly decay present on the occlusal the chewing surface would be called occlusal decay Decay present on multiple surfaces would be termed using the surfaces involved For example distal occlusal decay (D.O.) would be present on the distal and the occlusal surfaces Mesial lingual distal (M.L.D) decay would be present on those three surfaces Stages of decay The first stage is incipient decay It frequently exhibits as a white chalky lesion On x-rays it will appear entirely within the confines of the enamel It may or may not require treatment depending on overall size The second stage is decay to the dentino-enamel junction Also known as the D E J The D E J is where the enamel and the dentin are in contact This is the earliest stage where a restoration is required the preparation for the restoration will
be minimal and will extend just within the borders of the dentin. The third
stage is decay within the dentin. This decay can range to just within the
dentin too close to the pulp if close to the pulp the restoration could become in
the future a root canal. There may be more sensitivity to cold and hot in
comparison to the previous stages. The final stage of decay is decay to the
pulp. This stage will require root canal therapy RCT or extraction. It is the most
severe restorable stage of decay probable. The patient may have severe pain or if nerve is completely necrotic may have little to no pain. Decay and tooth layers the two pictures are the same radiograph
the left picture shows the three different layers of the tooth. The enamel the dentin and the pulp. The enamel is the white eggshell covering of the tooth. The
dentin is the inner grayer layer of the tooth and the pulp which is enclosed
inside of a pulp chamber is darkest gray the right picture shows the mesial DK
touching the DEJ the distal decay almost touching the pulpal tissue and the
occlusal decay which is a small dark spot. Decay and restorations. This slide shows on the left visual occlusal decay visual occlusal decay is not always
evident on an X-ray. In the center picture we have the radiographic occlusal decay which shows as a dark spot you can also see the radiographic mesial decay with an arrow larger radiographic distal decay is also present and extends to the pulp on the right there is a slide that shows
the completed occlusal restoration A completed mesial occlusal restoration
and a pulpotomy and stainless steel crown which is used to repair the large
distal decay.

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