Dog Breath is NOT Normal- Companion Animal Vets

Dog Breath is NOT Normal- Companion Animal Vets

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dog breath is not normal dog breath
should actually be quite sweet and definitely not make you squirm if your
dog has bad breath here’s what you need to know. Hi I’m Matt from Companion
Animal Vet Hospital and you’re watching our family pet care video series: your
guide to the latest information and best practices to help you care for your
family pet. To keep up to date hit the subscribe button below. Halitosis is the
fancy name for bad breath and while people often talk about dog breath like
it’s actually normal it is usually a sign of a health problem and often one
that is causing your dog pain. The most common cause of bad breath is
periodontal disease. Animal’s mouths are full of bacteria and some of those
bacteria adhere to the teeth and produced plaque. Plaque is that furry
feeling you get on your teeth if you miss brushing your teeth, it’s a soft
material which sticks to the surface of the tooth and it’s not visible to the
naked eye. Plaque is soft and can be brushed off the teeth. Over time though
the plaque develops into tartar or calculus. This is a harder material which
can be seen on the surface of the tooth as a yellowy brown substance. Calculus
sets on the tooth like cement it is not possible to remove it by brushing and by
the time calculus forms there is infection underneath the gums in the
pouch between the tooth and the gums. A common misconception is that giving
bones will clean teeth that have calculus or tartar on them. While hard
materials such as bones may break off some of the calculus the effect is
purely cosmetic the most important part to clean is the area underneath the gums
in the periodontal pocket. Not removing this material will not slow the
progression of infection into the root of the tooth. The only way to remove this
material is by scaling under the gum line. Treatment for periodontal disease
in the early stages involves a general anesthetic which allows the teeth to be
examined properly and also allows the teeth to be scaled and polished. This
needs to be done under anaesthetic as it’s just impossible to ask a dog to lay
on its side or back with its mouth open for half an hour while their teeth are
cleaned. Once anaesthetised the teeth can be probed to check for pockets and
x-rayed to check the 2/3 of the tooth that you can’t see. The teeth are then
scaled with an ultrasonic scaler above and below the gum line and polished. The
polishing smoothes the surface of the tooth to make it harder for the bacteria
to stick on the surface. Once we’re back to nice healthy teeth there are a number
of things that you can do at home to slow the build-up of plaque. Plaque can
form within 48 hours of professional cleaning so it’s really best to start
this is ASAP. The best way of preventing periodontal disease is with brushing!
Once daily brushing of your dog’s teeth is the gold standard in terms of
prevention but may not always be possible if your dog can’t be trained to
accept the brush or if you have a busy lifestyle. Other alternatives include
special foods such as Hills t/d, treats such as greenies or Oravet chews or
mouth washes. So, to sum up, bad breath is never normal in dogs and periodontal
disease is the most common cause of bad breath. Prevention measures should be
used to prevent periodontal disease. If you have any questions leave them in the
comments below and to keep up to date hit the subscribe button so just to sum up prevention I’m going
right to the end

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