How To Sing With Your Diaphragm (Part 1: Using Your Stomach) – LESSON 3 – Craig Shimizu Voice

How To Sing With Your Diaphragm (Part 1: Using Your Stomach) – LESSON 3 – Craig Shimizu Voice

Articles Blog


“And listen to the music of the night” Hi, I’m Craig from Shimizu Voice. and today I’m going to be talking about
how to use your diaphragm when you sing. How to actually control the diaphragm while
you’re singing. Why is it important? Well, if you don’t
control the diaphragm then it’s probably going to be causing you trouble. You’re going to be releasing too much air
when you sing and that’s going to be bothering your vocal cords. And you’re
going to strain and you won’t be producing the best
sound that you can. Is it hard? Yes and no. Because actually anytime
you’re controlling the release of air the diaphragm is being controlled. If you blow softly then probably the diaphragm is just doing what it
wants to do. After it expands to bring air into your
body it’s kind of just relaxing and moving up into
your ribcage. That’s why people think that the
diaphragm is pushing air out but it really doesn’t. I t’s just relaxing.
This lesson assumes that you know how to breed using your diaphragm. If you don’t know
yet them please see my YouTube channel “How
to Breathe With Your Diaphragm.” Just some reminders that even if you know
how to breathe with the diaphragm be sure that your shoulders aren’t
moving, and your upper rib cage, the sternum area is moving very little while you’re
doing these exercises. So, what we’re trying to do today is to control the ascent the diaphragm. What you don’t want to do is learn to
breathe diaphragmatically and then squeeze the air from the upper, out from the your chest. You’ve taken a nice diaphragmatic breath and then you start to sing with this happening. That doesn’t make any sense. So, what’s
supposed to happen is that after you bring diaphragmatically, you
want to take the air out from where you just put it in.
Like so. And what’s really good about this is that if you learn to pull your
stomach in correctly and hold the diaphragm down, it’s very
easy to do what I call “recover”. It’s very easy to get the next breath in to get you ready to sing for the next
line. Whereas if something goes wrong, if I breathe diaphragmatically, but then
I squeeze the air from my upper chest, my recovery is difficult. But that’s another lesson. That’s called “replenishment breathing”. You
just replace the air that you just used. if you didn’t use a lot, and you’re not
supposed to do for the average line which is only three-and-a-half to four
seconds long, then you shouldn’t have to replace a lot. So
again, what is key is how your stomach moves. Yes, this is still diaphragmatic breathing but if your stomach moves
incorrectly then it doesn’t matter what you do with your
diaphragm. It’s not going to be right. It’s not going to feel right. It’s not going to sound right. What I mean by that is that to use your
diaphragm correctly, the stomach is first. You have to be sure that the stomach moves in nicely. So, see if you can do that right now. Just take
an easy breath and blow gently. Easy breath… diaphragmatic. See if your stomach can move in… nicely. And when it’s time to breathe it’s almost like just opening your mouth and letting the air go back in. This is key to diaphragmatic singing. If
your stomach doesn’t do the right thing it, like the diaphragm, will be doing the
wrong thing. Your stomach’s going to be hardening,
tightening and squeezing your ribs and pulling your chest down. We don’t want that. So be sure that
you pull your stomach in nicely when you’re singing. And to inhale
you just have to let your stomach go and the air will go in where we want it. Right into the lower part of your lungs. So as
we go through the exercises be sure that’s what’s happening. Be sure
that you breathe diaphragmatically first. As you
blow, your stomach moves in comfortably and when it’s
time to inhale you recover nicely. So, at any time, as we proceed through
these exercises if you feel uncomfortable pause the tape go back and try it again. So the
first exercise number one. We have to do it, just a gentle breath. We’ll do that again. So take a
moderate breath, blow… was your recovery okay? If it was okay then
continue. So try it again. So if you can do that then continue.
Otherwise pause the video and do it or rewind it and try it again with me. The next thing
now is to blow harder. That’s going to tease the
wrong stomach muscles to participate. And you know that’s the wrong stomach
muscles because your chest falls. That’s called the fix
sternum. You’re not supposed to use the sternum
to breathe with or to sing with. It’s supposed to stay in a
relatively… it’s not exactly fixed. I have problems
with that term. But you’re not supposed to be moving it
a lot. And you can tell because when you use the sternum a lot,
the sternum is moving a lot, you’re jerking up for air or going down while you’re singing.
You feel out of control. Your recovery is poor. Be sure that your recovery, you’re always
feeling great as you’re going through this exercise.
Well, actually you should feel great doing any exercise. So, let’s blow harder now. How are you doing? How do you feel? If you don’t feel fine then pause the
video, and and do it again. Try to learn to blow
harder until you can do it. And when you
recover, the air pops right back to where it’s supposed to be.
Right in your stomach area. Okay, and the next step, blow as hard as
you can. (Blow) *Please give this video a thumbs up and go to Part 2. this is the sternum graying day

36 thoughts on “How To Sing With Your Diaphragm (Part 1: Using Your Stomach) – LESSON 3 – Craig Shimizu Voice”

  1. I often felt uncomfortable because my stomach felt clenched, but looking at your demonstration on how the stomach should look when breathing diaphragmatically is helping me to get over this. Β I also like how the printed words and diagram help to emphasize what you are saying. Β Also, nice light humor. Β Thank you.

  2. Craig I have a certain issue that's been annoying me to pieces and I am in desperate need of your help. Ok so for years I have been correcting my breathing technique and it has come rather natural to me. I can use my diaphragm for support and proof of that is through the 'hissing' exercises that force you to control the air flow and I am able to do it for an extensive amount of time. Here's the issue I often feel like when I'm singing my larynx doesn't move up much but I DO feel a slight movement upwards. Like it is VERY subtle but it is evident and it annoys me. Often times after singing my voice will feel slight irritated it will NOT however go hoarse or raspy. I just feel that my larynx isn't 100% neutral even tho I'm using diaphragmatic support. I find myself frustrated with this because if my larynx does subtly move upwards it is getting in the way of relaxation, 0 tension and a calm blend of the registers. Is there anyway I could send you a video of my singing that you could fix?

  3. Thank you for the detailed video !! so nice when there are people who have wisdom about what they give unconditionally !it is great !thank you !

  4. +Shimizu Voice Hi Shimizu! My big problem about that…i can breath and have a good support…but its seens like i ever have some air stuck in my chest….if i push out all my air, in the end i can push out more of mychest….this is annouyng, you know something about that? Thank you again for all your videos!

  5. Craig, you nailed it when you said "control the ascent of the diaphragm." Loved your explanation. Always good for me to revisit these key aspects of Appoggio. Thank you. Bob

  6. Hi Craig!

    All opera singing teachers say that you have to tense your entire abdomen like a rock for support ( appoggio) in the high notes mostly…
    Are they right or wrong?

    What can I do if must of the time I have to sing" a capella" in open areas?

    What is the best method to project my voice in this situation?

    Thank you in advanced.

  7. You've made my day again, my friend! I just came back to this video to check on my technique, and now I found that I was squeezing my abs inwards because I thought that was the proper use of the diaphragm. Now you helped me a lot with this video and I'm so grateful that's why I'm writing a lot! My singing is relaxed now, I can hit so much higher notes, my head voice is not malfunctioning anymore and the strange almost harsh throaty sound is gone from my voice. πŸ˜€ Everyone, this method is really working! πŸ™‚ Now I can go on stage confidently next week, singing traditional Hungarian folk songs, thanks to Shimizu Voice! Craige, I was wondering if you could teach me in person or on skype some day? πŸ™‚

  8. You've made my day again, my friend! I just came back to this video to check on my technique, and now I found that I was squeezing my abs inwards because I thought that was the proper use of the diaphragm. Now you helped me a lot with this video and I'm so grateful that's why I'm writing a lot! My singing is relaxed now, I can hit so much higher notes, my head voice is not malfunctioning anymore and the strange almost harsh throaty sound is gone from my voice. πŸ˜€ And even my aching jaw is seems to be gone too in a second. Everyone, this method is really working! πŸ™‚ Now I can go on stage confidently next week, singing traditional Hungarian folk songs, thanks to Shimizu Voice! Craig, I was wondering if you could teach me in person or on skype some day? πŸ™‚

  9. Hi Craig,
    There are two things i don't understand
    1. I have been following your videos about diaphragmatic breathing. All was going well, but when you came to singing with diaphragmatic breathing. I lost it, you said we have to hold our diaphragm down, yet we exhale as we sing and in all the previous exercises we have been exhaling as the diaphragm contracts. So it's like you are saying as we sing we are exhaling while holding our diaphragm down. But in the exercises we were exhaling as the stomach collapses and the diaphragm contracts, we din't hold it down
    2. They say we breath at the beginning of each phrase but when i listen to recorded music, singers don't follow this rule. They instead breathe in every after a measure or at times even they sing one and a half measures then inhale. So I'm lost, please when exactly do we
    Have to breathe in during singing?

  10. Nice video. Do you always use your diaphragm while singing? When I sing I only use my diaphragm when I need more air. Thanks.

  11. I would like to ask if it is okay to push my stomach out and to make it bloat while singing? Because it feels like the tension goes to the stomach not on the throat so i think it is a good idea so i always do it! But It is good or bad hehe thank you πŸ™‚

  12. You break down, and make easy most difficult and puzzling subject about learning how to be a good voice producer. – breathing! Appreciate it very much again.

  13. I learned the best and easy way to strenghten the diaphragm , just by making :"tsch" tsch" tsch" tsch" … like a train sounds !!! same with : "pa" ta" ga" and ta" sa" "ka" and so on … and giving every "tsch" a push with the diaphragm !!! but i know just this one teacher (a german) who shows this technic . and its so good … do you know what i mean ??? and what do you think about it ?? very nice channel by the way , you're one of the good guys πŸ™‚ cheers stephen

  14. So another vocal teacher on Youtube (Phil Moufarrege) has said to keep your belly out and firm while you sing, but you're saying it's imperative you pull the stomach in while you sing. Can you help clarify this?

  15. Hey Craig its jate. Should I breath out my diapghram while singing or try to hold as much air as possible? I get people sometimes saying I'm out of key. Kinda confused because I feel I am. So wondering if the way I'm breathing is causing them to say that

  16. Dear Craig, Thank you so much for making the breathing easy to understand. Your profile of the body helps to know what to do.:)

  17. Great great info !! I believe you are the best teacher I have seen train the correct way to breathe! I am so happy I found you ! Lee

  18. Craig I have a question. I have been practicing my breathing for months and I realised that when I breath and I sing on the exhale I tense but if I lie down on my back or get down on my hands and knees I don’t tense. What am I doing wrong?

  19. Dear Craig, Thank you so much for these videos! I just discovered them, and they are so clear and helpful. I have a question about the breathing, what should the lower abdomen be doing (like where the lower intestines are)? Does that part also relax and as a result protrude when the breath is taken in? Or, should I keep it always, gently, sucked in and firm?

  20. great video! stomach relaxation really matters. Is it correct to relax the whole front of body ? cuz I have to relax the whole front part of my body, only this way could I relax my stomach. look forward to ur reply, thanks

  21. So amazing that you can make a note keep longer with steady voice in lighter volume! How wonderful you with this singing skill!!! Would you explain it more?Does it relate to the stomach pulling in to the abdomen when air is blowing out from…? So wonderful!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *