Optical ‘dog’s nose’ may hold key to breath analysis

Optical ‘dog’s nose’ may hold key to breath analysis

Articles Blog


I am doctor James Anstie. I’m a theme
leader at the Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing
at the University of Adelaide and this is my experiment I guess what we’re trying to do here with this setup is to be to build an
optical dog’s nose you know every so often in the
media you see stories
that you know dogs can can detect whether there’s something
going wrong in your body by how your breath smells We think that dogs a great
but they’re not as easy to tame is light and so what we want to do is use light
in place if the dogs nose, to detect the molecules that are in your breath and also to
to figure out what’s going on inside we’re taking essentially white light
and we are sending it through a sample molecules and we’re watching
how those molecules absorb that light We expect in the next few months to approach
pop per million sensitivity and just put that in perspective puts us somewhere between a human and a
dog in terms of sensitivity One of the nice things about it
is that we can detect molecules that dogs can’t and we can also detect with very precise quantification what’s there.
The big difference is that we know what’s going on and we
know how to communicate it which is very difficult with the dog

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *