‘SUPERHUMAN’ Tribe Can Hold Breath for 13 MINUTES Underwater

‘SUPERHUMAN’ Tribe Can Hold Breath for 13 MINUTES Underwater

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Is it possible that humans could be like fish and survive
underwater? Surprisingly, evidence has emerged showing
this aquatic fact is kind of true! We’re a way off from being able to breathe
in the water like mermaids but one tribe certainly knows what they’re doing when it comes to
spending long periods in the briny deep. The Bajau People were first mentioned in the
16th century, via the journal of pioneering Venetian explorer Antonio Pigafetta. They’re native to Indonesia, and also the
southern Philippines and Malaysia. The tribe relies on the water for their way
of life, collecting meals from the sea bed. This means they spend an awful lot of time
submerged in the wet stuff! In fact, diving is a full-time occupation
for them. The Bajau reportedly devote 8 hours a day
to going underwater with only a mask and a weight to keep themselves in position. But how come they can last below the surface
for longer than the average person…? The answer lies in human biology. You see the Bajau possess a certain something
about them that makes them excellent at surviving in the water. That certain something is an enlarged spleen! The spleen is a versatile organ that is found
in your abdomen. It’s known for recycling old red blood cells,
in addition to storing white blood cells. There are lots of other things it does too,
but we’re in danger of being derailed here. The point is the spleen plays an essential
role in how the Bajau last in the drink. Have you heard of the human dive response? It’s when you go through a process called
“peripheral vasoconstriction”, in other words, your heart rate is reduced and your
blood vessels shrink. They do this on the outer reaches of your
body to keep oxygenated blood where it’s seriously needed in your organs. The spleen then contracts, pumping out oxygenated
red blood cells and supplying you with extra oxygen. With their bigger than average spleens, the
Bajau can take it to the limit for their underwater exploits. Now, a logical explanation for these spleens
is that the Bajau are always diving, so their bodies adapted accordingly, right? That’s a nice idea but not strictly accurate. Scientific study showed the spleens were present
in those who dived but also those who didn’t. However, there is a definite size difference
in Bajau spleens and those of their neighbors. It could, of course, be that the diving has
had an effect that’s passed down through all descendants but this is possibly a subject
for another time. So if there are humans on the planet who are
suited to undersea life, it makes you wonder if other types of “superhumans” are out
there. Maybe who can walk around in incredibly high
temperatures, or who can tolerate severe cold? This is starting to sound like an X-Men comic,
so it’s best to let science do the talking and leave it there…

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