Why Do We Have Such Bad Body Odor?

Why Do We Have Such Bad Body Odor?

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Guys… are you staying that far back because
I smell? It’s only been three days! And I dry shampooed! Hey guys, a non-smelly Amy with you on DNews
today taking on a topic we’ve all dealt with one way or another: gross stinky body
odor. Let’s start with the basic fact. We all
smell. And it’s because of skin. Our skin is our largest body organ, varying
from person to person but on average it’s about 21 square feet of surface area. It’s
layered to protect our delicate organs from dangerous germs and bacteria while also keeping
in moisture, basically making it an excellent barrier between our internal selves and the
outside world. And that barrier varies in its topography
and texture. There are folds, valleys, little niches, and it’s all home to a thriving
ecosystem of bacteria. Some of the bacteria on your skin can cause nasty infections, but
other bacteria actually fights off the bad microbes, keeping you healthy. And that in
itself is a finely tuned system; any disruption can cause skin disorders or infections. Skin also has loads and loads of sweat glands.
One kind are called eccrine glands and they’re everywhere. These are the ones that continually
bathe our skin in a salty-watery secretion, known as sweat, to cool us off. They can also
release fluid that acidifies the skin, keeping the growth of microorganisms in check. Another kind of sweat glands are the apocrine
glands. These are found mainly in notoriously sweaty and odorous areas like armpits and
groins. They respond to adrenaline and emotional stress, secreting a milky fluid that’s also
thought to contain pheromones. So there’s a lot of fluid going on with
skin, but that’s not the culprit of stink; sweat itself is actually odourless. The smell factors comes in because as we sweat,
the moisture gets into all those skin folds and nooks and crannies where there’s also
plenty of bacteria. And a moist, closed environment is bacteria’s happy place. They thrive in spots like armpits, eat compounds
found in sweat, and produce molecules that we smell and know as body odor. And there’s more to it. Diet can affect
your unique odor. Foods high in sulphur like broccoli and cauliflower release compounds
secreted in sweat that can make you smell worse, sort of like rancid butter. Meat also changes body odor. One study actually
found that vegetarian men’s sweat smells more appealing to women than their meat-eating
brethren’s. Alcohol can seep out through your pores if you over imbibe, making you
smell, well, like a drunk. But let’s say you have an average diet,
don’t drink too much, and lead a pretty standard lifestyle without engaging in especially
sweaty activities. How long until you really start to noticeably stink? Well, it varies
from person to person because no two people are the same. But a few days without showering,
deodorant, or basic washing will probably start to get unpleasant for people around
you. But it’s possible to push through the smell phase and get to a no-smell phase. Eventually
your body will settle into a happy arrangement of bacteria that keeps itself, and your smell,
in check. Because, really, we didn’t adapt to need perfumes and deodorants and body lotions…
It’s social convention that tells us to manage our natural human smell. You know who doesn’t stink? The team over
at Source Fed! They do pop-culture news and comedy… so it’s like us but faster and
funnier! Click the link below to get your daily dose of the trending news! And speaking of smelly, I’ve heard it smelled
pretty bad on board the Apollo spacecraft during missions to the Moon, not surprising
when you realize they were pooping and eating smelly things like tuna in that thing! If
you want to know more about that, check out my channel, Vintage Space, where I dig into
all kind of space oddities. Have you ever been aware of your own smell?
Let us know in the comments below, don’t forget to like this video, and subscribe for
a new episode of DNews every day of the week.

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